A sand artist is making waves with her ethereal beach art.

Edward is a “short-lived” Victorian artist in his late 40s who, like famed artist Banksy, has kept his identity hidden.

“I am withholding my full name because of an ideology expressed by Rumi, a Persian poet: ‘When you give up being self-absorbed, your being becomes one big community,’ Edward said.

Edward is a ‘short-lived’ Victorian sand artist in his late 40s who, like famed artist Banksy, kept his identity hidden

Edward said he preferred to be anonymous so people viewing his art could focus on the landscape.

Edward said he preferred to be anonymous so people viewing his art could focus on the landscape.

“The landscape is central and allows other members of the community to join in something that we share together.”

Edward’s latest piece was a face drawn in the sand on the back beach in Torquay, 104km south of Melbourne, on Tuesday.

The determined artist began his creation at 4am knowing that his work would be washed away within hours as the tide rose.

Edward’s final piece was a face drawn in the sand on the back beach in Torquay, 104km south of Melbourne, at 4am on Tuesday.

Edward's works are only visible for a short time before the tide comes in and washes them away

Edward’s works are only visible for a short time before the tide comes in and washes them away

Early risers could watch Edward work from the Surf Life Saving balcony using a rake and garden fork.

The face was photographed between rocks and greenery on one side and the foamy ocean on the other.

Edward said he was inspired to embrace the unique art form to reduce waste.

“Regenerative art connects the ecosystem to the community, regenerating ecosystems connects us to our planet,” he said.

Edward said he was inspired to embrace the unique <a class=art form to reduce waste and focus on regeneration” class=”blkBorder img-share” style=”max-width:100%” />

Edward said he was inspired to embrace the unique art form to reduce waste and focus on regeneration

He said it was important to him that people can appreciate his work and appreciate the land without creating waste.

“It’s quite simple, use a message in the sand rather than a metal billboard and lights that need to be recycled or thrown away, versus seeing our beautiful surroundings washing the sign and regenerating, without s ‘exhaust.’

He said he hopes his message of regeneration will grow and encourage Australian and international communities to reflect on the future.

“Every time I make an international piece of art, people around the world see our land and its beauty and no waste has been created,” he said.

He said he hopes his message of regeneration will grow and encourage Australian and international communities to reflect on the future.

He said he hopes his message of regeneration will grow and encourage Australian and international communities to reflect on the future.

One of Edward's most famous pieces is a koala climbing a burning tree he created during the Black Summer bushfires of January 2020

One of Edward’s most famous pieces is a koala climbing a burning tree he created during the Black Summer bushfires of January 2020

‘The artwork itself, within hours everything was back to normal. It looks beyond sustainability and towards the regeneration of our youth.

Edward said his inspiration came from spending time with nature and watching the sun rise and set.

“I made a rule to see the sunrise and sunset as often as possible in the week, it’s only 16 minutes in total, a small time commitment for a big reward,” he said. declared.

“I draw what I usually see at sunset, a bird, a plant, a pattern in the sand, the sun, the trees and the image that stays with me once I look away.” It has emotional content if it stays with me.

“Then I draw that in the dark, 4 a.m. for sunrise with my interpretation, and others see what they see in it and it takes on personal meaning for them. It’s art.

Edward’s mythical designs often feature geometric shapes and animals and are often captured by photographer Adam Stan.

One of his most popular pieces is a koala climbing a burning tree he created during the Black Summer bushfires of January 2020.

The BBC video of the play has been viewed over 133,000 times.

Tourism Australia has used Edward's work to promote travel to Australia to over 15 million Chinese social media users as well as over 12 million people in the UK.

Tourism Australia has used Edward’s work to promote travel to Australia to over 15 million Chinese social media users as well as over 12 million people in the UK.

Edward's favorite piece is a face he created in 2018 and said

Edward’s favorite piece is a face he created in 2018 and said ‘she looked pretty happy with all her features a bit off center’

Tourism Australia has used Edward’s work to promote travel to Australia to over 15 million Chinese social media users as well as over 12 million people in the UK.

Edward has recently started selling his work for between $5 and $500 each.

His favorite piece is an off-center face he drew in 2018.

‘My favorite has probably the least likes ever. It was a face and she looked quite happy with all her features a bit off center,’ he said.

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