An artist creates illusions of “car-tography”

He is a poet, painter, guitarist and, more recently, a photographer of model car illusions.

He is a poet, painter, guitarist and, more recently, a photographer of model car illusions.

Growing up, multi-talented entertainer Andre Feriante drove a number of classic cars: a 1968 Mustang, a 1972 Datsun 510, and a 1971 Lincoln Mercury Station Wagon, to name a few. He spent much of his youth in Italy and always enjoyed old things.

He now photographs some of these same classic cars, albeit in die-cast form, to create an image that can trick the mind into thinking the model car is a real car.

Feriante, a Langley resident known as the founder of Guitar Fest, stumbled across this additional creative outlet while at Rite-Aid while browsing the toy car section for kids’ gifts. He bought a small car.

“Almost immediately the idea occurred to me to see if I could make it look like it was a real car in the Rite-Aid parking lot,” he said. He started collecting cars and taking pictures.

He later learned that he had experimented with forced perspective photography, a technique that uses the space between subjects to create an interesting or unusual relationship between them. For Feriante, that involves strategically placing a model car somewhere — usually near water — and lowering his iPhone camera to eye level from the car’s windshield.

Some who do forced perspective photography often make model surfaces, like a small parking lot, to place their cars on. Feriante doesn’t, choosing instead to place a car on a natural surface like a wooden railing or gravel ledge.

“The hardest part is getting the wheels to the ground and getting the ground to be believable,” he said. “It eliminates that challenge, when you make this little model like that.”

After taking a photo, he likes to play with his iPhone’s built-in filters to create a whimsical finished product.

“I’ve never really been so realistic. I like the photos to be a bit impressionistic,” he said. “Sometimes you get a photo that, as it is, is right. But I like to play around with the filters a bit and give them a certain twist.

His abstract car photos featured a blurry couple, an old state ferry, and neon lights.

“I think the quest for beauty and the quest to understand what we’re doing here through serenity and nature runs parallel to my music, and the car happens to be something I love,” he said. he declares.

He calls his hobby “car-tography”. Her photos caught the eye recently when they were exhibited at the Artworks Gallery in Langley during July. He chose 13 to frame.

The reactions were varied. Feriante said he may have inadvertently won over some people when it comes to classic cars. He had heard people say they weren’t that into cars, but they changed their minds when they saw his photos.

He hopes to take his show on the road very soon at the Lodge at St. Edward State Park in Kenmore, where he currently plays music every Thursday.

He also thinks it could be fun to do custom portraits for people and their classic cars, as well as the diecast model equivalent of the car.

“The three characters would be there together in the picture,” he said. “You wouldn’t know that one of the cars is a toy car.”

For more information on Feriante, visit andreferiant.com.

Models of several classic cars appear to have been parked in South Whidbey Harbour.

Photos by Andre Feriante A model of a 1958 Corvette, pictured at South Whidbey Harbor on August 17, looks like a real car parked at the marina.

Photos by Andre Feriante A model of a 1958 Corvette, pictured at South Whidbey Harbor on August 17, looks like a real car parked at the marina.

Photos by Andre Feriante A model of a 1958 Corvette, pictured at South Whidbey Harbor on August 17, looks like a real car parked at the marina.

Photos by Andre Feriante A model of a 1958 Corvette, pictured at South Whidbey Harbor on August 17, looks like a real car parked at the marina.

Photo by Andre Feriante A model of a 1955 Mercedes, photographed at Freeland Marina.

Photo by Andre Feriante A model of a 1955 Mercedes, photographed at Freeland Marina.

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